Sunday, March 8, 2015

3/9 Makah whaling, forage fish harvest, local fisheries, WA nukes, LNG, Oso slide

Pig show off (Lauren Frohne/Seattle Times)
If you like to watch: Amy the pig performs at the Seattle Kennel Club Dog Show
A seasoned dog trainer charts new territory debuting her mini pig in obedience and agility demonstrations at the 2015 Seattle Kennel Club Dog Show. Lauren Frohne reports. (Seattle Times)

NOAA study could set stage for Makah whaling to resume
On Friday, NOAA Fisheries released a draft environmental study that could set the stage for the resumption of whaling off the Washington coast by the Makah Indian tribe. The draft proposes six options ranging from prohibiting an annual hunt for North Pacific gray whales to allowing up to 24 to be harvested within a six-year period. Hal Bernton reports. (Seattle Times)

West Coast fishery managers days away from landmark decision on forage fish
West coast fishery managers are poised to make a decision next week that could alter the future of fishing in federal waters off the Pacific Coast, as well as in Oregon's state-regulated nearshore waters. The Pacific Fishery Management Council is scheduled to vote Monday on a proposal to restrict new forage fisheries off the coast of California, Oregon and Washington unless prospective fishermen can prove harvesting a new species would not damage the ecosystem. Kelly House reports. (Oregonian)

Update: Roe herring fishery in Barkley Sound called off
The Department of Fisheries and Oceans called off the opening of the commercial roe herring fishery in Barkley Sound near Port Alberni late Saturday night, citing poor egg quality in the test fishery. “I suspect they were looking for a reason to cancel it,” said Tseshaht Chief Hugh Braker, who got the message just before midnight. His First Nation and four others were prepared to block the commercial fishing vessels on Sunday in the latest attempt to prevent over-fishing of roe herring in what they say is a sensitive area. When they got the news the fishery opening was cancelled they cancelled the protest. Sarah Petrescu reports. (Times Colonist)

Study: Bellingham, Blaine commercial fishing fleet plays big part in local economy
While Whatcom County’s economy has diversified in the past two decades, commercial fishing remains a significant contributor of jobs and revenue. That’s the conclusion of a newly released economic impact study that looked at commercial fishing and seafood processing activity in the Blaine and Squalicum marinas in 2013. According to the study, the industry employed 1,781 people, creating 870 jobs through spending money at other businesses, and another indirect 165 jobs. Those 1,781 people earned $94.5 million in 2013, according to the report. Dave Gallagher reports. (Bellingham Herald)

Nuclear energy scores 2 victories in Olympia
The Washington Senate wants the state Department of Commerce to begin looking for potential manufacturing sites for small modular reactors. By a 27-to-21 vote Friday, the Senate sent a bill to the House that would have the department find places to build and ship small modular reactors. Also Friday, the Senate voted 44-to-5 in favor of establishing voluntary nuclear education programs in schools. John Stang reports. (Crosscut)

Oregon LNG project races B.C. rivals
A liquefied natural gas project in Oregon must find suitable partners as it strives to beat B.C. rivals in the race to be the first large exporter of LNG from the West Coast of North America. Veresen Inc.’s Jordan Cove LNG venture has a prospective new partner, Energy Fundamentals Group Inc. (EFG), while other investors waiting in the wings include prominent Canadian hedge fund West Face Capital Inc., which has emerged as a surprise participant in the EFG-led consortium that is seeking to buy a minority stake in the project in Coos Bay, Ore. Brent Jang reports. (Globe and Mail)

Scientists have much more digging to do at Oso mudslide
Before the hillside above the Steelhead Haven neighborhood collapsed, killing 43 people, it was known as a site of periodic slides that did little more than divert the North Fork Stillaguamish River. In the year since, scientists have been trying to understand why a slope that behaved one way for much of recorded history suddenly turned into a massive and deadly mudslide on March 22, 2014. The main question, said Jonathan Godt, landslide coordinator for the U.S. Geological Survey, is why the slide traveled so far and so fast across the valley. Chris Winters reports. (Everett Herald)

Now, your tug weather--
WEST ENTRANCE U.S. WATERS STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA-
900 PM PDT SUN MAR 8 2015
MON
W WIND TO 10 KT...BECOMING NW IN THE AFTERNOON. WIND WAVES 1 FT OR LESS. W SWELL 3 FT AT 13 SECONDS.
MON NIGHT
W WIND TO 10 KT. WIND WAVES 1 FT OR LESS. W SWELL 3 FT AT 12 SECONDS.
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"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to msato@salishseacom.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

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