Tuesday, February 3, 2015

2/3 Sea slugs, cetacean ban, Canadian oil, Pt. Ruston, Maritime Discovery, bird flu, Tesoro strke

Hopkins’ rose nudibranch (UCSC Institute of Marine Sciences)
As ocean temps rise, pink sea slugs move slowly northward
Species of all kinds have been slowly shifting their habitat as climate change affects temperatures on the ground and in the sea. On the Pacific coast, that migration is a bit more colorful. As ocean temperatures have warmed over the last two decades, a bright pink species of sea slug has been inching northward, following its preferred thermostat settings up the coast of California. They are one of many marine animals on the move in reaction to a changing climate. The Hopkins' rose nudibranch (Okenia rosacea), a colorful, inch-long sea slug, can be found up and down the West Coast, from Baja to the Puget Sound. Brooks Hays reports. (UPI.com)

Cetacean ban off the table at Vancouver Park Board: John Coupar
The Vancouver Park Board won't be debating the issue of whales and dolphins in captivity any time soon, according to the board's chair. "The ban on cetaceans was not enacted. It's not enforced," Park Board Chair John Coupar told The Early Edition's Rick Cluff…. Coupar said the issue is now closed and likely won't be reviewed in the coming year. (CBC)

As oil price falls, output still growing from Canada’s sands
Canada’s oil sands prompted an unprecedented expansion over the last decade, but unusually high production costs. Now, oil-sands operators are scrambling to limit the damage, as crude prices hover near seven-year lows. Ian Austen reports. (NY Times)

EPA troubled by approach of Point Ruston developers
Federal environmental officials and the developer of Point Ruston have been at odds for more than a year over how the developer is using an exemption in federal law meant to encourage cleanup of contamination. The officials now contend the developer is using it to ignore building codes in the city of Ruston. The Environmental Protection Agency says the developer is stretching the limits of a federal law that allows construction without local permits on Superfund sites such as Point Ruston, which is contaminated with arsenic and lead. Kathleen Cooper and Kate Martin report. (Tacoma News Tribune)

$300,000 grant helps keep Port Townsend Maritime Discovery Initiative sailing on
A major grant supporting Port Townsend School District’s Maritime Discovery Initiative has ensured the program’s continuation, according to the district superintendent. “We are out of the gate,” said David Engle of the $300,000 allocation from the Satterberg Foundation, a Seattle-based group promoting a just society and sustainable environment. “This grant allows us to get really serious about the long-range planning of the project.” The Maritime Discovery Initiative is designed to take advantage of Port Townsend’s location to insert maritime aspects of environmental, recreation and business studies into the district’s curriculum Charlie Bermant reports. (Peninsula Daily News)

State Places Quarantine On Bird Flu Site Near Riverside, Washington
Washington state has set a six-mile quarantine circle around a new major bird flu site in near Riverside in north-central Washington. About 5,000 birds -- mainly ducks but also geese, turkeys and chickens -- are in the infected flock. These animals were used in retriever-dog field trials. U.S. Department of Agriculture officials are on the scene now. Hector Castro with Washington’s Department of Agriculture said the team of government officials will likely start the bulk of the work next week and that 40 pheasants and all of the farm’s 14 turkeys have died. Anna King reports. (KUOW) See also: Long recovery expected for B.C. poultry industry after avian flu, expert says  Geordon Omand reports. (Globe and Mail)

Tesoro steelworkers on strike in Anacortes
Members of the United Steelworkers United gathered in the rain outside the gates of the Tesoro refinery here Monday to strike over stalled negotiations for a new contract. The Anacortes plant was one of nine nationwide that the USW called on to strike Sunday after the union rejected the fourth contract offer, which was being negotiated by Dutch Royal Shell on behalf of companies including Exxon Mobil Corp. and Chevron Corp. It was not immediately clear whether some of the affected refineries would have to shut down during the strike. But the Anacortes facility continues to operate. Colette Weeks reports. (Skagit Valley Herald)

Now, your tug weather--
WEST ENTRANCE U.S. WATERS STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA- 300 AM PST TUE FEB 3 2015
TODAY
E WIND 5 TO 15 KT. WIND WAVES 1 OR 2 FT. W SWELL 8 FT AT 13 SECONDS. RAIN LIKELY.
TONIGHT
SE WIND 5 TO 15 KT. WIND WAVES 1 OR 2 FT. W SWELL 7 FT AT 12 SECONDS. CHANCE OF RAIN.
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"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to msato@salishseacom.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

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