Wednesday, February 25, 2015

2/25 Octo crab, Keystone, Shell smell, snow pack, sea rise, surf fall, seawall, Meadowdale Park, BC ferries

Octo crab (PHOTO: Porsche Indrusie/Guardian)
If you like to watch: Octopus filmed jumping out of water to catch and devour passing crab
Octopus are amazing creatures in many ways, but this remarkable video, recently captured by Porsche Indrisie in Yallingup, Western Australia… (The Guardian)

Defying GOP, Obama vetoes Keystone XL pipeline bill
Defying the Republican-run Congress, President Barack Obama rejected a bill Tuesday to approve construction of the Keystone XL oil pipeline, wielding his veto power for only the third time in his presidency. Obama offered no indication of whether he’ll eventually issue a permit for the pipeline, whose construction has become a flashpoint in the U.S. debate about environmental policy and climate change. Instead, Obama sought to reassert his authority to make the decision himself, rebuffing GOP lawmakers who will control both the House and Senate for the remainder of the president’s term. Josh Lederman reports. (Associated Press) See also: Obama veto isn’t only problem for Keystone pipeline  Sean Cockerham reports. (McClatchy)

Shell refinery apologizes for odor released over Anacortes
Shell oil refinery at Anacortes has apologized to its neighbors in the city and on the Swinomish Indian Reservation for releasing a strong sulfur odor. Spokesman Cory Ertel told the Skagit Valley Herald the odor was released Friday during maintenance work and was stopped as soon as the source was identified. He said Monday no harmful levels were detected. (Associated Press)

B.C.'s low snow pack could affect salmon run in summer
Balmy winter weather in B.C. could lead to trouble in the months ahead, if the unseasonably small snow pack doesn't improve and leads to dangerously low water levels. Snow levels have been so low that six ski resorts in the province have closed, according to the British Columbia Snow Report. And with Environment Canada forecasting sunshine and temperatures up to 10 C this weekend, it doesn't look like snow conditions will improve anytime soon. (CBC)

US sea level north of New York City 'jumped by 128mm'
Sea levels north of New York City rose by 128mm in two years, according to a report in the journal, Nature Communications. Coastal areas will need to prepare for short term and extreme sea level events, say US scientists. Climate models suggest extreme sea level rises will become more common this century. Helen Briggs reports. (BBC)

Climate change may flatten famed surfing waves
On a summer day in 1885, three Hawaiian princes surfed at the mouth of the San Lorenzo River on crudely constructed boards made from coastal redwoods, bringing the sport to the North American mainland. Today their wave-riding successors consult satellite weather forecasts on smartphones before heading to Steamer Lane and Pleasure Point in Santa Cruz to don neoprene wetsuits. But the new century could bring the biggest transformation yet to surfing - the waves themselves. A rapidly changing global climate will likely affect prime surfing spots worldwide. In California, the forecasts for Monterey Bay's famed big swells, while far from certain, are also far from good. James Urton reports. (San Jose Mercury News)

Seattle’s new seawall also a highway for fish
Seattle’s $330 million replacement seawall is taking shape — and local fish are taking notice. Workers have completed the first section of the wall, including a migratory corridor for juvenile salmon that will eventually run the entire length of the downtown waterfront. The finished section sits between South Washington Street and Yesler Way, near the Colman Dock ferry terminal at the southern end of the waterfront. It features a suite of design elements meant to attract fish and other aquatic animals and plants. Daniel Beekman reports. (Seattle Times)

Deal ensures land near Meadowdale Beach Park won’t be developed
For the past decade, the future of 13 acres of wooded, steep hillside overlooking Meadowdale Beach Park has been debated. Now that battle has come to an end. The city of Lynnwood has reached an agreement to buy the property from developers for $6 million, Jared Bond, the city’s environmental and surface water supervisor, said Tuesday. Sharon Salyer reports. (Everett Herald)

BC Ferries petition with 20,000 signatures moves to legislature
Frustrated by soaring ferry costs that make it increasingly difficult to leave Powell River for family visits, Laural Eacott turned to the world’s largest online petition platform in an attempt to get government attention. And she certainly got it Tuesday, when a list of more than 20,000 names collected over the past year on Change.org was tabled in the B.C. legislature. The petition calls for BC Ferries to be stripped of its independent status and be returned to the jurisdiction of the provincial highways department, which could provide it with additional funding. Mark Hume reports. (Globe and Mail)

Now, your tug weather--
WEST ENTRANCE U.S. WATERS STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA- 218 AM PST WED FEB 25 2015
TODAY
S WIND TO 10 KT IN THE MORNING...BECOMING LIGHT. WIND WAVES 1 FT OR LESS. NW SWELL 4 FT AT 11 SECONDS. A CHANCE OF RAIN.
TONIGHT
SW WIND TO 10 KT...BECOMING SE AFTER MIDNIGHT. WIND WAVES 1 FT OR LESS. NW SWELL 4 FT AT 13 SECONDS. RAIN LIKELY.

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