Tuesday, February 25, 2014

2/25 BC salmon, smelt fishing, Skagit flood control, BC LNG, Oly dock, North Beach sewage

White February (Vancouver Sun)
If you like to watch: Vancouver’s snowfall seen through social media

Green groups seek federal auditor's help on $26 million B.C. salmon inquiry
Two British Columbia conservation groups are asking the federal auditor general to examine Ottawa's response to a $26-million public inquiry into the collapse of West Coast salmon stocks. The Watershed Watch Salmon Society and SOS Marine Conservation Foundation have filed an environmental petition with the federal auditor. The groups say in the 16 months since the report came out the government has failed to act on the recommendations. Already, 18 recommended deadlines have come and go without any clear action, they say, and another looms next month. The groups want the auditor general to compel the federal fisheries minister to reply to

State might set limits on smelt fishing
Fishing for smelt, a popular pastime among some people, could be restricted to protect smelt populations and possibly even increase the food supply for birds, fish and marine mammals, officials say. Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife is seeking comments on two options. One would reduce commercial and sport fishing for smelt. The second would close commercial smelt fishing altogether. Smelt are small, silvery fish that spawn on certain beaches throughout Puget Sound.... Total numbers of the fish have never been measured, and the cost of doing so would be prohibitive, said Craig Burley, manager of WDFW’s fish management division. What is known, Burley said, is that the total amount of fishing has gone up in recent years, creating potential threats to the population, especially in heavily fished areas.... For those interested, WDFW staff will discuss the options during a public meeting at 6 p.m. March 21 at the department’s Mill Creek office, 16018 Mill Creek Blvd. Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission will take testimony on the plan during its April meeting in Olympia. The commission could take action as early as June. Chris Dunagan reports. (Kitsap Sun- paywall)

Army Corps waits to choose preferred flood control project  
The Skagit River General Investigation Study, now well into its second decade of existence, is going to have to wait a little longer before one of the three proposed flood control projects is chosen to receive expanded analysis. The study aims to give communities results from studies that can be used to get federal funding for flood-control projects. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers met Monday to consider three projects, as well as a no-action project, and choose one to bring to 35 percent design. The corps headquarters asked a few questions of the report and should designate a “tentatively selected plan” within the next month, said county project manager Kara Symonds. Rachel Lerman reports. (Skagit Valley Herald)

B.C. prepared to cap local taxes on LNG development
The B.C. government is prepared to limit the power of local government to impose industrial taxes on new liquefied natural gas plants, setting the stage for a showdown over the independence of municipal authorities. Rich Coleman, the minister responsible for the development of LNG, said cabinet is looking at establishing a cap on municipal industrial property taxes to provide certainty to proponents. Justine Hunter reports. (Globe and Mail)

First Nations want a piece of new LNG tax
The Carrier Sekani Tribal Council says First Nations should receive a share of a new tax on liquefied natural gas the province expects to help feed a $100-billion prosperity fund. The first details of the tax for the nascent industry were unveiled by Premier Christy Clark’s government last week. (Vancouver Sun)

Does new fuel dock need more study?
Port of Olympia Commissioner Sue Gunn, the newest member of the commission, took center stage at Monday’s meeting, asking her colleagues to consider more analysis for a proposed fuel dock that would serve recreational and commercial boats in the area. There currently is no fuel dock at the port; the two closest are several miles north at Boston Harbor and Zittel’s at Johnson Point. Gunn raised the idea of further studying the proposed fuel dock because she has several concerns. Rolf Boone reports. (The Olympian)

Small sewage leak closes Port Townsend's North Beach
A “no contact” advisory is in effect for the waters off North Beach Park in Port Townsend, where city officials reported an intermittent leak of treated sewage Monday. Jefferson County Public Health issued the health advisory for all of North Beach, with warning signs at the county park. The public is advised to avoid surfing, swimming, boating, fishing and the harvesting of shellfish and seaweed at North Beach. Shellfishing always is closed in the area because of the proximity of the sewage plant outfall. (Peninsula Daily News)

Now, your tug weather--
WEST ENTRANCE U.S. WATERS STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA- 300 AM PST TUE FEB 25 2014
SMALL CRAFT ADVISORY IN EFFECT THROUGH THIS AFTERNOON
TODAY
E WIND 15 TO 25 KT. WIND WAVES 2 TO 4 FT. W SWELL 4 FT AT 14 SECONDS. A CHANCE OF RAIN THIS MORNING.
TONIGHT
E WIND 15 TO 25 KT. WIND WAVES 2 TO 4 FT. W SWELL 4 FT AT 12 SECONDS.

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"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to msato@salishseacom.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

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