Wednesday, November 27, 2013

11/27 Jet fuel protest, Navy whales, dying seastars, Whatcom water, chum salmon, Lacey Murrow Bridge

From BirdNote
If you like to listen: BirdNote-- Learn how turkeys cross rivers!
"In the early 1800s, John James Audubon wrote: "The great size and beauty of the Wild Turkey, its value as a delicate and highly prized article of food... render it one of the most interesting of the birds indigenous to the United States of America." Read Audubon's description of how Wild Turkeys, which walk more than they fly, cross a river..."

Jet fuel protesters hold emergency meeting in Richmond
Opponents of a controversial proposal to build a jet fuel facility on the South Bend of the Fraser River held an emergency meeting in Richmond, B.C., Tuesday. The project would bring more jet fuel to Vancouver International Airport and if approved, see a jet fuel terminal, tank farm and pipeline built on the river and through Richmond. Part of the proposal by Vancouver Airport Fuel Facilities Corporation would also involve using jet fuel tankers coming into waters in South Richmond.

Judge in Seattle sets deadline for plans to protect whales from Navy sonar use
A federal judge has set an August deadline for the National Marine Fisheries Service to reassess how it will protect whales and other ocean life from the U.S. Navy's expanded use of sonar in training exercises off the West Coast. U.S. District Court Magistrate Judge Nandor Vadas said in a ruling Tuesday that officials must ensure that the Navy's training exercises comply with the federal Endangered Species Act by Aug. 1. In September, Vadas ruled that officials failed to consider the best available scientific data when it approved permits for the Navy in 2012. He also said the agency should consider the long-term effects of the ongoing activities on whales and other marine life. The permits had authorized a five-year Navy plan for operations in the Northwest Training Range Complex. That area stretches from Northern California to the Canadian border.

You decide if you want to watch: Watch Underwater Video Of Sea Stars Dying Off West Seattle
(Laura) James wondered how sea stars in Seattle’s Elliott Bay were faring. This past weekend, she took her underwater camera and dove off West Seattle’s shoreline at a place called Cove 1, a popular spot for both local divers and sea stars. The underwater pilings at Cove 1, James said, are normally covered with an army of brightly colored sea stars. The first few minutes of James’ video, filmed a year ago, shows what this area normally looks like. The second half of the video, captures a very different scene. Katie Campbell reports.

Water wells surface as Whatcom's biggest controversy
Conservative property-rights advocates are sounding an alarm over proposed restrictions on wells they fear could mean the end of the rural way of life in Whatcom County. The well controversy arose after environmentalists challenged Whatcom County rules that they believe don't do enough to protect water resources. In response to the challenge, the state Growth Management Hearings Board issued a ruling that could block property owners from drawing water from their wells, if the basin where they live is closed to new water rights. The county has appealed the ruling to the state Court of Appeals. Ralph Schwartz reports.

Chum salmon rising
Ever consider eating the lowly chum salmon? The poor cousin of tasty relatives like chinook, coho and sockeye, chum has gotten a bad rap over the years. But when "keta salmon," as it is now marketed, is caught fresh from the ocean and processed quickly, the mild taste and flaky texture make it a great eating fish. And at $7.50/lb for a thick fresh fillet, it compares favorably to fresh Chinook's $29.99/lb price tag and even previously frozen sockeye, which runs around $12.99/lb. Kevin Bailey reports.

The Sinking Of The Lacey V. Murrow Memorial Bridge
The Lacey V. Murrow Memorial Bridge that connected Seattle to Mercer Island sank to the bottom of Lake Washington 23 years ago this weekend. Here in the Evergreen State, there’s something peculiar about bridges and windstorms.  Take the original Tacoma Narrows Bridge back in November 1940. Bad design doomed that span from the start and earned the bridge an appropriate nickname.  “Galloping Gertie” was blown down in a gale just four months after it opened. Feliks Banel remembers.

Now, your tug weather--
WEST ENTRANCE U.S. WATERS STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA- 717 AM PST WED NOV 27 2013
TODAY
SE WIND 10 TO 20 KT. WIND WAVES 1 TO 3 FT. W SWELL 6 FT AT 13 SECONDS. CHANCE OF RAIN.
TONIGHT
SE WIND TO 10 KT. WIND WAVES 1 FT OR LESS. W SWELL 5 FT AT 14 SECONDS.
THU
LIGHT WIND. WIND WAVES LESS THAN 1 FT. W SWELL 6 FT AT 13 SECONDS. CHANCE OF RAIN.
THU NIGHT
W WIND TO 10 KT. WIND WAVES 1 FT OR LESS. W SWELL 5 FT AT 11 SECONDS.

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