Wednesday, November 13, 2013

11/13 Longfellow Cr., Still Cr., Hawaii orcas, climate storms, fossil fuel futures, butt recycling, Lynnwood stink

Tropical Orca (PHOTO: Aliza Milette)
If you like to watch: Longfellow Creek - Nov. 11, 2013
Laura James shares: "Fish... healthy fish and sad sick fish, in Longfellow Creek near Seattle Washington. I wonder how many days it takes for them to be poisoned by the water into which they swim... I logically know they are supposed to swim upstream and die, and that is natural order of things, but i still find watching the sickened fish who will die pre-spawning due to toxins and pollutants very sad."

Mystery white liquid may be harming Still Creek, B.C. salmon
A mysterious white liquid seems to be leaking into East Vancouver's Still Creek, raising concerns about the health of the chum salmon that had just returned there to spawn for the first time in 80 years.  Bruce Causier posted a video of the leak on YouTube Friday, and the liquid was still seen flowing when CBC News visited the creek to investigate on Tuesday. The City of Vancouver says staff is investigating the substance, but have not yet determined the source.

Oceanic killer whales being tracked near Hawaii
For the first time, researchers are tracking by satellite a group of “tropical oceanic” killer whales, a type rarely seen and almost a complete mystery to scientists. Researchers from Olympia-based Cascadia Research were in Hawaii, on the final day of a 15-day research cruise to study marine mammals, when they encountered four killer whales offshore from Kona. They were the type of orca known to roam the open ocean, but rarely seen by human observers. In fact, in 14 years of research work in Hawaii, Cascadia’s Robin Baird said he has encountered these tropical killer whales only three times before. Others have seen them on occasion, but sightings are few and far between. Chris Dunagan reports.

Scientists say as climate changes, odds increase for deadly storms
Members of an international conservation group say it’s time to prepare for more intense, more frequent and more damaging storms in Puget Sound. "We're going to be seeing more of these storms, they're going to be more severe, and they're going to be more frequent than historically, was the case," said Chris Davis of the Nature Conservancy. Davis said the science makes it clear that storms have already begun to get more intense. He cited one last December that created the highest tide ever recorded in Seattle and flooded neighborhoods that are usually protected by bulkheads.

Tankers, barges and trains, oh my: The growing fossil-fuel threats in Washington  
Vast amounts of crude oil, primarily from the Bakken shale formation in North Dakota, is being transported by rail throughout the United State and Canada. Eleven rail terminals are in various stages of completion in Washington state in anticipation of receiving this “shale on rail.” The public and regulators need to take a closer look at the big picture. Fred Felleman opines.

Nexen group kickstarts LNG project by paying B.C. $24-million to secure Prince Rupert land
The B.C. government has reached a deal with Chinese-owned Nexen and two Japanese partners that will clear the way for the companies to pursue a liquefied natural gas project near Prince Rupert. The private venture, called Aurora LNG, won the right to acquire land at Grassy Point, north of Prince Rupert. Brent Jang reports.

U.S. predicted to become world’s largest oil producer in 2015
The United States will surpass Russia and Saudi Arabia to become the world’s largest oil producer in 2015, the International Energy Agency (IEA) forecasts. But the IEA’s long-term energy outlook, released Tuesday, predicted the Middle East will retake its position a decade later as the dominant source of global-oil-supply growth. Sean Cockerham reports.

Public has longer to weigh in on Vancouver oil terminal plan
The state agency reviewing a proposed oil terminal at the Port of Vancouver says it's giving the public more time to comment on the project as part of an environmental-impact evaluation. The scoping period, launched Oct. 3 and originally scheduled to wrap up Nov. 18, will now last until 5 p.m. Dec. 18. The process aims to determine what will be examined in an environmental impact statement.  Aaron Corvin reports.

Cigarette butt recycling launched in Vancouver  
Vancouver is launching a pilot program to recycle cigarette butts in an effort to clean up one of the most pervasive types of urban trash. As part of the program, 110 receptacles to collect butts will be mounted on posts around the city's downtown. The butts will be collected by employees from the city's Downtown Eastside, who will take them to United We Can, which already runs a recycling depot for bottle collectors.

When it rains, it stinks at Lynnwood condos
They worry when it rains. When a storm hits the Casa Del Rey Condominiums in Lynnwood, sewage burbles up in bathtubs, shower drains and kitchen sinks. Sheri Cooley and her partner hurry to shower and cook dinner before the flooding. Once it starts, they have to go to a minimart up the street, buying mints or candy so they can use the bathroom as paying customers, she said. Rikki King reports.

WEST ENTRANCE U.S. WATERS STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA- 300 AM PST WED NOV 13 2013
TODAY
SW WIND 5 TO 15 KT. WIND WAVES 2 FT OR LESS. SW SWELL 7 FT AT 10 SECONDS. SCATTERED SHOWERS THIS MORNING.
TONIGHT
SW WIND 5 TO 15 KT. WIND WAVES 2 FT OR LESS. W SWELL 6 FT AT 9 SECONDS. A CHANCE OF SHOWERS.
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