Tuesday, October 29, 2013

10/29 Stormy weather, oil trains, Fraser Surrey Docks, B'ham lagoon, Southlands, oil seep, sewer power, Chickamauga

'Wall cloud' near Lakewood (NWS/KIRO-TV)
If you like to watch: Rain storm hits Puget Sound, Aug. 29, 2013
The National Weather Service in Seattle told KIRO 7 Meteorologist Morgan Palmer they were “this close” to issuing a Tornado Warning for this cell near Lakewood. Radar detected rotation within the storm, and this wall cloud was seen by many as the cell passed through. A wall cloud is a lowering of the cloud base that sometimes precedes a tornado. The last time the NWS issued a Tornado Warning in our area? 1997!

More oil trains expected in Washington under proposals
Hundreds of trains carrying crude oil could soon be chugging across the Northwest, bringing potential jobs and revenues but raising concerns about oil spills, increased train and vessel traffic and other issues. With five refineries, Washington has long received crude oil from Alaska and elsewhere by ship, barges or pipelines. But ports and refiners are increasingly turning to trains to take advantage of a boom in oil from North Dakota's Bakken region. Three terminals — in Anacortes, Tacoma and Clatskanie, Ore. — are already receiving crude oil by trains. Other facilities are proposed at the ports of Grays Harbor and Vancouver, and at refineries. Together, the 10 projects would be capable of moving nearly 800,000 barrels per day, said Eric de Place, policy director at Sightline Institute. Phuong  Le reports.

Petitioners want broad human health study at Fraser Surrey Docks
Opponents of a proposal to expand the Fraser Surrey Docks coal terminal presented Surrey city council with a petition on Monday afternoon that calls for broad human health studies to be conducted before a final decision is made on the project. Paula Williams, organizer of a group called Communities and Coal, says that over the past three months, more than 11,000 people signed the anti-expansion petition. Williams says that it’s not necessarily coal dust that her group opposes, but diesel particles from the train engines hauling coal to the terminal on the Fraser River.

Bellingham council open to other uses than marina for wastewater lagoon
A new marina and the fate of old Georgia-Pacific Corp. buildings were among the issues discussed Monday, Oct. 28, as City Council members continued the time-consuming job of fine-tuning waterfront redevelopment plans. Council members have said they hope to complete their review of the plans by the end of 2013. At the urging of council members Jack Weiss and Michael Lilliquist, the council voted 4-1 to change waterfront master plan language to indicate that G-P's wastewater treatment lagoon might be used for something other than the marina that the Port of Bellingham has envisioned there for many years. John Stark reports.

Latest Southlands proposal again divides community
The 30-year-old battle over Delta’s Southlands was reignited Monday as hundreds of residents turned out for the first of three public hearings on the latest development project planned for the former Tsawwassen farmland. More than 96 people registered to speak Monday on the project by Century Group, which calls for 950 townhomes, cottages, small family homes and a farmers market on the 217-hectare former site of the Spetifore Farm. The plan, the latest in a series of eight development applications, has once again split the community, with those in favour wearing orange-and-white YES stickers, and those opposed donning red ball caps that read “No Houses” and waving house-shaped pieces of plastic with NO! on them. Kelly Sinoski and Randy Shore report.

Work begins to contain oil seeping on Bellingham waterfront
Crews are beginning work to contain oil that is intermittently seeping from a waterfront cleanup site near downtown Bellingham, the Washington Department of Ecology said Monday, Oct. 28. The oil, first discovered in December 2012, is seeping from a small area of shoreline at the R.G. Haley cleanup site at the foot of Cornwall Avenue, near Wharf Street. The site is known to be contaminated with wood treatment chemicals from past industrial activities. From the mid-1800s to the mid-1900s the site was used for industries including lumber, coal and wharf operations.

B.C. firm looks at sewers to power sustainable energy shift  
Lynn Mueller, head of International Wastewater Systems, has a keen interest in sewers. More specifically, he is obsessed with the hot water people flush down their drains and figuring out ways to recycle all that heat to be used again as energy for building systems — heating, air conditioning and hot water. “A lot of people probably dream about other things than (sewage heat recovery), but I’ve been thinking about it for a long time,” Mueller told The Sun. Derrick Penner reports.

Raised tug removal is at a standstill in Eagle Harbor
The historic tugboat “Chickamauga,” which sank in its mooring early Wednesday, Oct. 2, at the Eagle Harbor Marina, has been raised to the surface and the pollutants it spilled have been properly cleaned. The salvage company Global Diving & Salvage, under contract to the Coast Guard, did manage to raise the vessel to the surface and stabilize the boat. That’s as far as things have gone... Due to legal issues surrounding the ownership of the boat, the Coast Guard contractor was unable to facilitate the moving of the derelict vessel. Luciano Marano reports.

Now, your tug weather--
WEST ENTRANCE U.S. WATERS STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA- 300 AM PDT TUE OCT 29 2013
TODAY
E WIND TO 10 KT THIS MORNING...BECOMING LIGHT. WIND WAVES 1 FT OR LESS. W SWELL 3 FT AT 12 SECONDS.
TONIGHT
LIGHT WIND...BECOMING S TO 10 KT AFTER MIDNIGHT. WIND WAVES 1 FT OR LESS. W SWELL 4 FT AT 14 SECONDS.
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