Friday, July 5, 2013

7/5 Ship rescue, train derail, BC sludge, cleanup bill, Cedar Grove, zero waste, BC tribal fish, fish virus

If you like to watch: Matt Prigee's illustrated guide to lawmakers' triumphs and foibles of the last session (or three). A comic con: Washington Legislature 2013

A cargo ship lost steering off Port Angeles just after midnight Wednesday and was towed into the Port Angeles Harbor for repair. The state Department of Ecology received a report from the state Emergency Management Division that the Grand Quest lost steering 6 nautical miles northwest of Port Angeles in the Strait of Juan de Fuca just after 12:15 a.m. The Grand Quest is a 587-foot Panama-flagged auto carrier that left Astoria, Ore., at 5:35 p.m. Tuesday, and was on its way to Tacoma, according to the ship's GPS locator beacon. The Brian S., a Port Angeles-based tug, towed the ship to anchor in Port Angeles at about 3 a.m., said Petty Officer Katelyn Tyson, a Coast Guard spokeswoman. Cargo ship loses steering, towed to Port Angeles for repairs  

Burlington Northern Santa Fe says a freight train has derailed in Everett, leaving four cars off the track, but no injuries or spills. The main rail line north of Seattle is blocked by the cars. Railroad spokesman Gus Melonas says the cars that derailed around 4:10 a.m. Friday, just outside the rail yard nearly 30 miles north of Seattle. They were carrying barley and paper products.  Amtrak and freight trains will drive around the derailment, as railroad workers spend the day getting the train back on the tracks and making any necessary track repairs. Freight train derails in Everett; no injuries  

An angry public has pushed regional politicians into abandoning plans for a sewage sludge facility at Viewfield Road in Esquimalt. The Capital Regional District board voted Wednesday to no longer consider a sludge site on Viewfield after public consultation sessions showed overwhelming opposition to the location. The vote was unanimous, with several CRD board members admitting the Viewfield debacle was a mistake that badly damaged public trust in the regional government and its contentious sewage treatment plans. Rob Shaw reports. Spurred by rancour, CRD abandons plan to build sewage sludge plant in Esquimalt  

In an unexpected vote, the state Senate approved changes to a new toxics cleanup bill that addressed the concerns of environmentalists. The so-called "trailer bill," which modified the Model Toxics Control Act reform bill that passed on June 13, received a 34-13 vote in the Senate on June 28. The amending bill was delivered to Gov. Jay Inslee for his signature.... Democrats introduced the trailer bill in the House on June 23 to adjust language that they noticed in the original bill after it had been signed by the governor. Democrats wanted the law to limit the types of stormwater projects that qualify for cleanup funds, and to restrict polluting companies' access to the money. Ralph Schwartz reports. Toxics cleanup bill aimed at Bellingham waterfront gets environmentally friendly fix

Something stinks in the cities of Everett and Marysville, and city officials want to get to the bottom of it, using professional sniffers to pinpoint the stench. Some blame the Everett water treatment facility, and others blame the Cedar Grove composting plant. To get to the bottom of this smelly mystery, city officials are trying to trace where exactly the stench is coming from using small devices called e-noses. Luke Duecy reports. Everett using electronic nose to sniff out source of mysterious stench

As Metro Vancouver pursues a zero-waste solution to its garbage problem, other regional districts are taking the same approach on a smaller scale. In Squamish-Lillooet, for example, a draft zero-waste report for part of the district will be discussed at a committee meeting on Monday. The area is running short of approved places to put its garbage, and the report’s findings are expected to become part of a district-wide plan for solid-waste management. Wendy Stueck reports. Zero-waste plan gaining ground in B.C. communities  

The B.C. Court of Appeal has ruled a Vancouver Island First Nation has the right to conduct commercial fisheries. The 10-year legal fight over fish and shellfish fisheries wound its way to the Supreme Court of Canada before the final word was released Wednesday from the province’s appeal court. The Nuu-chah-nulth went to court saying its people have been fishing and trading their catch long before Europeans arrived, and that translates to modern-commercial fishing rights. First Nation’s right to commercial fishery upheld by B.C. appeals court

A lab that revealed the first evidence of an infectious virus in British Columbia salmon has been stripped of its international credentials. The lab, run by Fred Kibenge of the Atlantic Veterinary College – University of Prince Edward Island, was one of a handful certified by the World Organization for Animal Health for its expertise in detecting the infectious salmon anemia virus. Andrea Woo reports. Lab that found virus in B.C. salmon stripped of credentials after audit  

Here’s your weekend tug weather--
WEST ENTRANCE U.S. WATERS STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA- 856 AM PDT FRI JUL 5 2013
TODAY
W WIND 5 TO 15 KT. WIND WAVES 2 FT OR LESS. W SWELL 5 FT AT 12 SECONDS.
TONIGHT
W WIND 10 TO 20 KT...BECOMING SW TO 10 KT AFTER MIDNIGHT. WIND WAVES 1 TO 3 FT...SUBSIDING TO 1 FT OR LESS AFTER
 MIDNIGHT. W SWELL 5 FT AT 9 SECONDS.
SAT
S WIND TO 10 KT...BECOMING SW 5 TO 15 KT IN THE AFTERNOON. WIND WAVES 2 FT OR LESS. W SWELL 6 FT AT 9 SECONDS.
SAT NIGHT
W WIND 10 TO 20 KT...EASING TO 5 TO 15 KT AFTER MIDNIGHT. WIND WAVES 1 TO 3 FT...SUBSIDING TO 2 FT OR LESS AFTER
 MIDNIGHT. W SWELL 6 FT AT 9 SECONDS.
SUN
LIGHT WIND...BECOMING W TO 10 KT IN THE AFTERNOON. WIND WAVES 1 FT OR LESS. W SWELL 6 FT AT 8 SECONDS.

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