Thursday, July 19, 2012

7/19 Gov. Gregoire, sewage, Duwamish, water poll, Kitsap PSP, BP oil on rail, NOAA science Swinomish salmon, SnoCo shores. PT Paper, Pete Jackson

Chris does Puget Sound:  Governor praises Hood Canal mitigation program   and Governor visits Shellfish-tival  and Pete Haase’s first-person account, The Governor’s Visit to the Samish Bay Taylor Shellfish Farm

New blog: Victoria Sewage: Now Can We Flush?

Two pipes will cut a 21kilometre path through the capital region, helping to turn sewage into heat, gas and solid fuel. One pipe will punch along three kilometres of waterfront paths and seabed to Esquimalt. A second pipe will stretch 18 kilometres under residential roads to Hartland landfill in Saanich where, if all goes according to plan, a plant will turn sludge into gas and solid fuel. The transformation of sewage into energy will answer a public demand for social, economic and environmental benefits from Greater Victoria's proposed sewage treatment system, said Tony Brcic, project manager for core area wastewater treatment. "It's true, real and immediate resource recovery."  Sewage pipes to cut 21K path through region

The Duwamish is among the most polluted urban waterways in the Northwest. The lower part of the river was declared a Superfund site in 2001. That means the polluters have to work with the Environmental Protection Agency to clean it up. More than ten years later the EPA and the polluters are close to proposing a clean up plan. But there’s still some debate about how clean this river should be. Ashley Ahearn asks: The Question On Polluted Waters: How Clean Is Clean?  

A new public opinion poll finds that water quality ranks as Northwesterners’ top environmental concern. Davis, Hibbitts & Midghall Research asked 1,200 residents in Washington, Idaho and Oregon about their environmental concerns. Sixty percent said they worried about drinking water. Fifty-four percent said they were concerned about local lakes, rivers and streams. Those results track with previous polls. People said they were happy overall with the water that comes out of their tap.  Poll Finds Water Quality NW Residents Top Concern  

Kitsap County health authorities have expanded the shellfish closure related to paralytic shellfish poison into North Kitsap. Recreational shellfish harvesters are advised not to take any clams, mussels or oysters from the eastern side of the Kitsap Peninsula from Point Jefferson near Kingston south to the Pierce County line, including all of Bainbridge Island, Blake Island, Liberty Bay and Miller Bay, according to a notice from the Kitsap Public Health District. Shellfish warning expanded into North Kitsap  

BP Cherry Point Refinery may eventually use the railroad to get part of its crude oil supply from the Bakken Formation in Montana and North Dakota. Company spokesman Mike Abendhoff confirmed Wednesday, July 18, that BP officials have visited Whatcom County planning officials to discuss possible construction of $60 million worth of rail improvements at the refinery site to accommodate unit trains of crude oil tanker cars. If the project becomes a reality, the added volume of rail traffic is expected to be relatively low: a train every other day at first, and perhaps a train a day at maximum capacity, Abendhoff said.  BP Cherry Point refinery could get crude oil shipments by rail  

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, with the help of local teachers, is bringing real science to the classroom.  Teacher in the Lab is an expansion of the NOAA Teacher at Sea program, which establishes a partnership between teachers and NOAA to inspire students to become their next generation of scientists.  The sole purpose: Inspiring future NOAA scientists   

Washington salmon depend on the cold water from glacial lakes to survive. But as temperatures increase and glaciers shrink, salmon populations are declining, threatening the way of life for the Swinomish Indians, also known as the "salmon people." Hari Sreenivasan at PBS News Hour talks to Brian Cladoosby.  Swinomish Tribe Works to Adapt to Shrinking Salmon Supply

The Washington Department of Ecology has approved Snohomish County’s updated shoreline master program. The county’s updated program replaces its 1974 shoreline program – a set of guidelines that will result in significant improvements in the protection, use, development and restoration of the county’s estimated 2,000 miles of freshwater and marine shorelines. The update combines local plans for future development and preservation with new development ordinances and related permitting requirements. The update also significantly improves alignment of shoreline codes with environmental protection and with the county’s current comprehensive land-use plan and other codes.  Snohomish County’s Shoreline Master Program Update Gets Nod

Like lightning? Cliff Mass writes: "One blog reader told me how she and her friends were outside watching a lightning display and their hair started to stand on end, and then a lightning stroke hit nearby.  They are lucky to be alive." Lightning Safety

Paper bags, containerboard and pulp are a few products that come to mind when thinking about the Port Townsend Paper Cop. mill. What about electricity? Promoted as a “win-win” by PT Paper and its affiliates, the proposed cogeneration project is a $55 million investment into new technologies that can expand the mill’s current biomass burning capability to generate heat needed for pulp and paper production, and electricity to sell onto the regional power grid.   The $55 million question: Will PT Paper's cogeneration turn a profit?  

As The Herald's new editorial page editor, Peter Jackson wants to focus on ideas and solutions. Jackson, 46, is a well-known writer, conservation advocate and community voice throughout the Pacific Northwest. He was named to the Herald post on Wednesday, replacing longtime editorial editor Bob Bolerjack, who left the company in June. Peter Jackson named Herald editorial page editor  

Now, your tug weather--
WEST ENTRANCE U.S. WATERS STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA- 300 AM PDT THU JUL 19 2012
TODAY
LIGHT WIND...BECOMING W 10 KT IN THE AFTERNOON. WIND WAVES 1 FT OR LESS. W SWELL 3 FT AT 9 SECONDS.
TONIGHT
W WIND 10 TO 20 KT. WIND WAVES 1 TO 3 FT. W SWELL 3 FT AT 9 SECONDS. A CHANCE OF SHOWERS AFTER MIDNIGHT.

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