Monday, March 26, 2012

3/26 Salish Sea News and Weather: Tulips, Sound pilots, ghost ship, Tesoro spill, Kitsap shoreline, lead shot, Saanich sewage, coal trains, Mukilteo midden, Chinook season, K'omoks, Cedar Grove compost, enviros on pipeline, x-treme weather, Miss Universe Canada

In Skagit County, the blossoming of the tulips and subsequent throngs of on-lookers visiting the Tulip Festival designate, for many, the changing of the seasons.  Tulips expected to be right on time  

Good story: Puget Sound pilots are the 52 elite mariners who guide vessels around local waters. Pilots, who each made about $340,000 last year, say they're underpaid; shippers who pay their salaries disagree. Bob Young in the Seattle Times reports. Puget Sound pilots: Job of risk, reward   

After being flushed out to sea by last year’s massive tsunami and earthquake, a Japanese squid-fishing boat has drifted across the Pacific Ocean and was about 120 nautical miles off British Columbia’s north coast Friday evening. The 150-foot ship was found drifting right-side-up about 140 nautical miles (260 km) from Cape Saint James, on the southern tip of Haida Gwaii. Ghost ship lost in Japanese tsunami drifts to B.C. coast

Tesoro Anacortes refinery spilled about 27,000 gallons of gasoline-quality material Saturday morning from an above-ground storage tank into a containment basin. The spill did not reach surface water, according to a release from the state Department of Ecology. Cleanup efforts are under way, the release states. Crews will drain the product and some rainwater from the basin. They will recover most of the product for reprocessing, and the rest will go though the refinery’s industrial wastewater treatment system. Cleanup of spill under way at Tesoro

The first open house dedicated entirely to the proposed Kitsap County Shoreline Management Master Program will be Tuesday at the Kitsap County Administration Building in Port Orchard. The plan is the result of a three-year effort by Kitsap County planners and a shoreline task force consisting of residents representing various interests. Proposed shoreline rules to be discussed at county open house  

"I live with the results of lead shot," said Martha Jordan, a 62-year-old wildlife biologist from Everett. "I live it, I breathe it - and it just sickens me when people continue to use it. ... It's pretty heartwrenching for everybody involved. I don't want to do this. I don't want to spend my time picking up dying swans. We pick them up every year. It's a constant, chronic problem." In a move opposed by many hunters, Jordan, along with 100 organizations in 35 states, wants the Environmental Protection Agency to ban or severely limit the use of toxic lead in hunting ammunition. Judson Lake swan biologist among those pushing for federal ban on lead ammo

About 30,000 litres of sewage leaked out of a pressurized sewage pipe that burst at a Cordova Bay pump station Wednesday. The leak occurred at the southeast corner of Haliburton Road and Lochside Drive and much of the sewage ended up in storm drains, travelling to the beach below, which remains closed. It could take weeks to determine why Saanich sewage pipe burst

EarthFix’s Ashley Ahearn talks to Eric de Place, a researcher with Sightline Institute about the supply of coal in the Midwest, the demand for coal from China, and the Northwest being right in the middle.  EarthFix Conversations: Coal Coming Through A Community Near You?  http://earthfix.kcts9.org/energy/article/earthfix-conversations-coal-coming-through-a-commu/

The area proposed for a new ferry terminal in Mukilteo is laced with a shell midden containing Indian artifacts, but state and tribal officials say it won't necessarily pose an obstacle to the project. Indian artifacts found at Mukilteo dock site  

Sports anglers should look at the bigger picture before refusing to accept further restrictions on the summer chinook fishery, conservation groups say. Conservation must come before the interests of any fishing sector, whether recreational, First Nations or commercial, said Aaron Hill of Watershed Watch Salmon Society. "Any harvesting sector who refuses to comply with necessary conservation measures does not deserve any fish at all and violations of conservation-based fishing regulations should be prosecuted to the full extent of the law." Chinook recovery must trump fisheries, conservationists say

Members of a small first nation in Vancouver Island's picturesque Comox Valley have taken a major step toward securing $17.5-million and more than 2,000 hectares of land under a final treaty. The K'omoks First Nation, which has about 275 members, signed an agreement in principle Saturday with the provincial and federal governments. Of the 60 first nations participating in the treaty process, only two, the Maa-nulth, located on Vancouver Island's west coast, and the Tsawwassen, located south of Vancouver, have signed final treaties, according to the BC Treaty Commission.  B.C. first nation one step closer to $17.5-million treaty  

Recent state testing on emissions at one of Cedar Grove Composting's plants showed the presence of some toxic substances such as benzene and formaldehyde, but officials say it doesn't mean the business poses a hazard to human health.  The testing was done by the state Department of Ecology last June only to gather information about composting operations in general and not to investigate any operation in particular. Cedar Grove Composting plant emissions test shows low-level toxins

An email discussion by key members of the conservation movement in British Columbia focused on the proposed Enbridge Northern Gateway pipeline project and revealed some broad disagreements over the biggest environmental issue facing the province. Among the many contributors were Carmen Purdy, former president of the BC Wildlife Federation, Ray Demarchi, the retired chief of wildlife conservation for the province, and Dave Narver, former director of the B.C. Fisheries Branch. Environmentalists differ sharply on pipeline proposal

The past decade has been one of unprecedented weather extremes. Scientists of the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK) in Germany argue that the high incidence of extremes is not merely accidental. From the many single events a pattern emerges. At least for extreme rainfall and heat waves the link with human-caused global warming is clear, the scientists show in a new analysis of scientific evidence in the journal Nature Climate Change. Less clear is the link between warming and storms, despite the observed increase in the intensity of hurricanes. Extreme Weather of Last Decade Part of Larger Pattern Linked to Global Warming  

Oh, No, Canada! Vancouver's Jenna Talackova did not meet pageant 'requirements' Miss Universe Canada disqualifies transgender contestantl

Now, your tug weather--
WEST ENTRANCE U.S. WATERS STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA- 245 AM PDT MON MAR 26 2012
GALE WARNING IN EFFECT THROUGH TUESDAY MORNING
TODAY
SE WIND 10 TO 20 KT. WIND WAVES 1 TO 3 FT. W SWELL 4 FT AT 13 SECONDS. SHOWERS LIKELY.
TONIGHT
SE WIND 15 TO 25 KT...RISING TO 25 TO 35 KT AFTER MIDNIGHT. COMBINED SEAS 4 TO 6 FT WITH A DOMINANT PERIOD OF 13 SECONDS. A CHANCE OF RAIN IN THE EVENING...THEN RAIN AFTER MIDNIGHT.

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