Wednesday, April 5, 2017

4/5 English Bay spill, who needs KM, Puget Sound $, starving orcas, Canuck the Crow

Cherry blossom
A cherry blossom is the flower of any of several trees of genus Prunus, particularly the Japanese cherry, Prunus serrulata, which is called sakura in Japanese. Currently it is widely distributed, especially in the temperate zone of the Northern Hemisphere including Japan, China, Korea, Europe, West Siberia, India, Canada, and the United States. Along with the chrysanthemum, the cherry blossom is considered the national flower of Japan. The transience of the blossoms, the exquisite beauty and volatility, has often been associated with mortality and graceful and readily acceptance of destiny and karma. (from Wikipedia) See also: Cherry blossom time at state capital brightens spring days  Jim Camden reports. (Spokesman-Review)

Company charged in English Bay fuel spill must challenge summons in B.C. court
A Federal Court judge has rejected an application for judicial review filed by a Greece-based company facing charges in a 2015 fuel spill in Vancouver’s English Bay, saying it must make its case in British Columbia Supreme Court. The MV Marathassa and Alassia NewShips Management Inc. each face 10 charges, including discharge of a pollutant and failure to implement an oil pollution emergency plan and are scheduled to appear in B.C. Provincial Court on Wednesday. Alassia had asked the Federal Court to set aside summonses and declare that attempts to serve the documents by the Public Prosecution Service of Canada and the Attorney General were invalid. (Canadian Press)

Report questions need for Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain expansion
While Kinder Morgan works toward starting construction on its $7.4-billion Trans Mountain pipeline expansion, Simon Fraser University academic Tom Gunton argues Canada’s oil industry might not need the new pipeline once it’s complete. In a new report released Tuesday, Gunton argued that with all the projects under development, including the Trans Mountain expansion, Keystone XL and Energy East pipelines, combined with recent forecasts showing dramatically less growth in Canadian oil output, the country will wind up with massive overcapacity to move oil. Trans Mountain, however, said the project still has “strong commercial support,” and economists argue that Canadian oil-producers need the substantial outlet to offshore markets that the Trans Mountain pipeline would provide. Derrick Penner reports. (Vancouver Sun) See also: Be prepared for some wait-time at Lake Samish’s boat launch on Thursday. Here’s why  Kinder Morgan will be conducting an emergency response exercise on Thursday from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Lake Samish as part of the company’s “ongoing commitment to safety and emergency preparedness.” (Bellingham Herald)

State leaders urge budget support for Puget Sound
Three dozen members of Congress are calling on President Donald Trump not to eliminate money for Puget Sound and other bodies of water. U.S. Representatives Derek Kilmer, Denny Heck and Dave Reichert, all of Washington, are among those who signed a bipartisan letter to the president Tuesday. They are all part of the Puget Sound Recovery Caucus. Trump's budget blueprint released last month eliminates the Environmental Protection Agency's geographic programs to clean up Puget Sound, the Great Lakes, Chesapeake Bay and other water bodies. (Associated Press)

Are Southern Resident Killer Whales starving? | SeaDoc Society
On March 6, the SeaDoc Society together with the National Marine Mammal Foundation and NOAA Fisheries assembled top U.S. and Canadian marine mammal experts for an urgent consultation on the nutritional condition of our Southern Resident Killer Whales (SRKW), the fish-eating orcas that have historically “resided” in the Salish Sea. After 2015’s encouraging “baby boom,” 2016 was a disastrous year for SRKW, which suffered seven deaths, reducing the total population of our three pods – J, K and L – to just 78 individuals. Along with dangerously low numbers and wild swings in their reproductive success, another troubling sign is that instead of staying organized in their full pods, the killer whales have recently been observed fragmenting into smaller groups, most likely because they’re having a harder time finding prey, especially the large Chinook salmon that are their most important source of food. Bob Friel writes. (Islands Sounder)

Canuck the Crow back ruling the roost in east Vancouver
Canuck the Crow is a free bird again. He was released from the Night Owl Bird Hospital in Kitsilano on Tuesday morning, brought home by his buddy Shawn Bergman and set free in his east Vancouver neighbourhood. “It looks like he’s going to be all right,” Bergman said. “It’s good he’s back in the neighbourhood, back in the swing of things. It’s nice to see him doing a lot of the things he did before.” Understandably, after being attacked by a soccer dad with a flagpole on March 25 and knocked cold, Canuck seems a little less trusting of strangers, Bergman added. Gordon McIntyre reports. (Vancouver Sun)

Now, your tug weather--
WEST ENTRANCE U.S. WATERS STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA-  245 AM PDT WED APR 5 2017  

TODAY
 E WIND 10 TO 20 KT EASING TO 10 KT EARLY THIS MORNING AND  BECOMING W THIS AFTERNOON. WIND WAVES 3 FT OR LESS. SW SWELL 10  FT AT 12 SECONDS. RAIN LIKELY.
TONIGHT
 W WIND TO 10 KT. WIND WAVES 1 FT OR LESS. W SWELL  11 FT AT 13 SECONDS. RAIN LIKELY.

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