Monday, August 8, 2016

8/8 Fraser fish, dead humpback, marine cleanup, stressed trees, sewage, canoe journey

(PHOTO: Associated Press)
Ichiro Suzuki Gets 3,000th Career Hit In Major Leagues
Ichiro Suzuki has gotten his 3,000th career hit in the major leagues, becoming the 30th player to reach the milestone. The Marlins outfielder did it Sunday with a triple in the seventh inning against Colorado at Coors Field. Miami players came out of the dugout to congratulate Suzuki, and he waved his helmet to acknowledge the cheers. (Associated Press)

Fraser River sockeye run may be a no-go for local fishermen
With fish counts remaining extremely low, it’s looking less likely that local commercial and tribal fishermen will get a chance to catch Fraser River sockeye salmon this summer. Fishermen in Canada and the U.S. have been waiting for the green light from the Pacific Salmon Commission to begin fishing for sockeye that are returning to the Fraser River in lower British Columbia. In its most recent assessment on Friday, Aug. 5, the sockeye run remains below expectations and the river remains warmer than normal, both factors in not opening the run. Dave Gallagher reports. (Bellingham Herald)

Humpback whale dies after stranding in West Seattle
Hundreds of people flocked to the Fauntleroy ferry terminal in West Seattle on Sunday morning to watch the dramatic — and ultimately heartbreaking — attempt to save a juvenile humpback whale that became stranded just 20 feet from shore. Angela Wood and Michael Sughrue raced from Renton when they learned from the Orca Network that the approximately 30-foot marine mammal was in trouble. Both sat on a log looking out toward the water and cried silently after learning that efforts to save the cetacean had failed. Christine Clarridge reports. (Seattle Times)

Living Oceans seeks funding for tugboat services for marine cleanup
What’s been billed as the biggest marine cleanup in Canadian history may not be completed unless a tugboat can be hired to haul an estimated 40 tonnes of marine debris from Vancouver Island to the Lower Mainland. According to the Living Oceans Society, $50,000 must be raised in the next month to pay for the services of a tugboat operator to pull a barge loaded with trash down the west coast of the Island and then to Steveston in Richmond, where the harbour authority has provided dock space and equipment for volunteers to sort the debris and send it out for recycling…. The cleanup began in February and involves a number of groups, including The Resort Municipality of Ucluelet, the Nuu-chah-nulth Tribal Council, the Ocean Legacy Foundation, Surfrider Foundation and the Vancouver Aquarium. Jennifer Saltman reports. (Vancouver Sun)

From mountain forests to city parks, trees are stressed and dying
From mountain forests to city parks, trees that suffered terribly in last year’s drought are dying, and burgeoning pests are taking advantage of stressed trees struggling to hang on. More than 500 dead trees from big leaf maples to cottonwoods, birches and more already have been counted this year in Seattle city parks, and summer’s far from over. A typical year sees 130 trees culled, said Jon Jainga, urban forestry operation manager for Seattle Parks and Recreation. Statewide, officials are seeing trees with red needles, dead tops, dying branches, dropped needles and other signs of stress. Implicated in the unfolding treemageddon is the drought of 2015. Lynda Mapes reports. (Seattle Times)

Japan uses sewage to fuel hydrogen-powered cars
When Mutsuro Yuji, chief of the central sewage plant in this southern Japanese city, first heard about the idea of making hydrogen from biogas — the combination of methane and carbon dioxide produced by the breakdown of organic matter — he was skeptical. “I thought it was a joke,” he said. But after a $12 million investment from Japan’s government, plus research, engineering, design and building work by Mitsubishi, Toyota and Kyushu University, Yuji is no longer laughing. Starting late last year, drivers of vehicles like the Toyota Mirai and Honda Clarity have been able to drive up to the sewage plant and power up their hydrogen fuel cell cars. The station is working only 12 hours a day but is making enough hydrogen to fill 65 cars daily. That could increase to 600 if all the biogas at the plant is used. Julie Makinen reports. (Los Angeles Times)

Pleasant Beach sewer issues resolved
Development is flowing once again on the south end of Bainbridge Island. The city took steps in the past year to address a sewage capacity shortage that stalled new construction south of Winslow, according city spokeswoman Kellie Stickney. New relief valves were installed on a force main pipe running between Lynwood Center and a treatment plant off Fort Ward Hill, which will help prevent airlocks in the line. Stickney said the city also installed a bypass vault at a pump station to allow workers to flush the pipe. It conducted a daylong flush that removed 20 years of sludge buildup…. The city resumed issuing building permits in the south end this summer, Stickney said, though additional sewage upgrades are still being considered. Tad Sooter reports. (Bainbridge Islander)

Nisqually’s Canoe Journey reignites Coast Salish culture
Dancers wearing black and red shawls with fringe that shimmered in the sunshine gracefully stepped and spun to the heartbeat-like cadence of hand drums. Nisqually tribal elder Cleo Frank proudly watched as the Coast Salish group shared its songs and dances on the soccer field-sized patch of dusty brown grass circled by huge white tents. A wide grin spread across Frank’s face when she talked about the joy she gets from seeing the tiny tots mimic the older ones. It’s one of the ways that Coast Salish culture will stay alive, she said. And it’s going to ensure the canoe journey and all of its traditions remain accessible for future generations. Lisa Pemberton reports. (Olympian)

Now, your tug weather--
WEST ENTRANCE U.S. WATERS STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA-  300 AM PDT MON AUG 8 2016  

TODAY
 SW WIND TO 10 KT...BECOMING NW 5 TO 15 KT IN THE  AFTERNOON. WIND WAVES 2 FT OR LESS. W SWELL 4 FT AT 9 SECONDS.  SHOWERS IN THE MORNING...THEN A CHANCE OF SHOWERS IN THE AFTERNOON.  TONIGHT  W WIND 5 TO 15 KT...EASING TO 10 KT AFTER MIDNIGHT. WIND  WAVES 2 FT OR LESS. W SWELL 4 FT AT 8 SECONDS. A SLIGHT CHANCE OF  SHOWERS.

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