Monday, February 22, 2016

2/22 Salmon DNA, Tacoma methanol, rockfish DNA, Bainbridge trees, Chinook jargon

Adams River sockeye (John Lehmann/CBC)
Salmon hatcheries produce genetically different fish, study finds 
New research from Oregon State University suggests hatchery-raised salmon, which are bred to help bolster wild stocks in B.C. and elsewhere, are genetically different from the populations they're introduced into. Researcher Michael Blouin says scientists have known for some time the offspring of wild and hatchery-raised salmon are less adept at surviving in the wild, negatively affecting the health of wild populations. The question is, what is it about hatcheries that create fish believed to be inferior at surviving in the wild? "What we found is that when you compare the fish that had two wild parents with those that had two hatchery parents, we see hundreds of genes with different activity," Blouin told On The Coast guest host Michelle Eliot. (CBC)

Tacoma Methanol Plant Project On Hold As The Company Pauses Environmental Review
Northwest Innovation Works, the Chinese-backed company that has been seeking to build one of the world's biggest natural gas-to-methanol plants at the Port of Tacoma, said in a statement that it's decided to "pause the environmental review." "We have been surprised by the tone and substance of the vocal opposition that has emerged in Tacoma," the company said. "To force a facility on a community that does not welcome it would not be consistent with our goals." Northwest Innovation, whose major investor is an arm of the Chinese government, said it will engage the Tacoma community in further dialogue over the next several months. Charla Skaggs, a spokeswoman for the company, declined to comment further. Ashley Gross reports. (KPLU)

Re-evaluating rockfish
One day last year, Jay Field of Anacortes went fishing for yelloweye rockfish, and caught what he describes as a gorgeous 18-pounder. Fishing for that species has been unheard of in the area for years because it is protected under the Endangered Species Act. But Field, captain of Dash One Charters, was contributing to the latest rockfish research. Fisheries managers from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the state Department of Fish & Wildlife say results of that research could change the protection status of some rockfish. Kimberly Cauvel reports. (Skagit Valley Herald)

Old growth forest may fall to affordable housing
An old growth forest on Bainbridge Island may soon turn into a clear cut for affordable housing. The Suzuki Property is surplus land for Bainbridge Island. The city doesn't need it and no longer wants to own it, but it's filled with some of the area's oldest trees -- one estimated at 218 years. "An old growth forest where the roots extend the height of the tree," explained arborist Olaf Ribeiro. "So, you're looking at the root system extending at least 200 feet away." That's why Ribeiro says even minimal development could harm the oldest trees. The city, however, believes no development could harm the local economy. Alison Morrow reports. (KING)

When Was Chinook Jargon Prevalent In The Northwest?
Chinook Jargon was a trade language that once ruled the Northwest. But when was it used, and how many people spoke it? Listener Michelle LeSourd of Seattle asked KUOW's Local Wonder. Liz Jones reports. (KUOW)

Now, your tug weather--
WEST ENTRANCE U.S. WATERS STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA-  225 AM PST MON FEB 22 2016  

TODAY
 W WIND 5 TO 15 KT. WIND WAVES 2 FT OR LESS. W SWELL 10  FT AT 13 SECONDS. SHOWERS ENDING BY AFTERNOON.

TONIGHT
 W WIND 5 TO 15 KT...BECOMING E AFTER MIDNIGHT. WIND WAVES  2 FT OR LESS. W SWELL 11 FT AT 14 SECONDS...SUBSIDING TO 9 FT AT  14 SECONDS.
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