Tuesday, November 10, 2015

11/10 SeaWorld, BC LNG, tribe climate, winter prep, Vic sewer trees, night tide walk, cruiser trippers

SeaWorld San Diego (John Gastaldo/San Diego Union Bulletin)
Killer Whales to Take Final Bows at SeaWorld San Diego
SeaWorld said on Monday that it planned to phase out next year its San Diego killer whale performance, a central point for criticism of how its animals are treated. The company, which also has parks in Orlando, Fla., and San Antonio, said in a company document posted on Monday that it would replace its theatrical Shamu show in San Diego with an “informative” experience that has a “conservation message inspiring people to act.” The announcement does not affect shows with orcas at the parks in Texas and Florida, said Fred Jacobs, a company spokesman. Daniel Victor reports. (NY Times) See also: Washington Senator Plans To Reintroduce Orca, Dolphin Captivity Ban  …. Democratic state Senator Kevin Ranker cautiously welcomed the news about SeaWorld phasing out its orca shows in San Diego.Austin Jenkins reports. (NW PUblic Radio)

Activist group urges Trudeau to block LNG project to protect B.C. salmon
A new alliance formed by aboriginal leaders and environmental activists wants the newly elected Liberal government to block a liquefied natural gas project in northwestern British Columbia. Donnie Wesley, a Lax Kw’alaams tribal chief who started a protest camp in August on the site of the proposed LNG terminal, is urging Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Environment Minister Catherine McKenna to take action to protect juvenile salmon habitat. Mr. Wesley has enlisted the backing of nearly 80 native groups, environmental organizations, unions and an array of other supporters.  Brent Jang reports. (Globe and Mail)

Washington Tribe Confronts Climate Change, Sea Level Rise
A big question will confront international leaders in the next round of climate talks in Paris: How do they help poor, island and coastal nations threatened by rising oceans, extreme weather and other climate change-related risks? In the Northwest, sea-level rise is forcing a Native American tribe to consider abandoning lands it has inhabited for thousands of years. Ashley Ahearn reports. (KUOW)

Snow coming to Cascades, storms to Western Washington  Jack Broom reports. (Seattle Times) More rain on the way for Metro Vancouver after record-setting weekend storm  Bethany Lindsay reports. (Vancouver Sun)

Vancouver prepares for winter flooding, 'King Tides'
Vancouver city crews sandbagged a two-block stretch of sidewalk along Locarno Beach on Monday, to guard against the possibility of storm-driven flooding during seasonal high tides later this month. The sandbags have become an annual precaution along the low-lying stretch of Northwest Marine Drive between Tolmie and Trimble streets. But city officials say a more permanent solution is planned in anticipation of a future of increasingly intense and more frequent storms, and higher sea levels due to climate change. Glen Schaefer reports. (Vancouver Sun)

How rejecting a sewage plant led to removing 5,000 trees
The impending cut of nearly 5,000 trees on Watkiss Way to make way for a hay farm complies with Saanich and B.C. regulations, but has raised questions about the unintended consequences of recent council decisions, as well as concerns about climate change…. The vast majority of the fir and cedar trees on 24 acres behind Victoria General Hospital — purchased two years ago by Allen Vandekerkhove — will be taken down…. Given the loss of so many trees, it would have been wiser had council voted last summer to forward the site to Capital Region District directors for consideration for a sewage treatment plant, said Mayor Richard Atwell. That motion was defeated twice, 5-4 and on a 4-4 tie, largely because of opposition voiced by councillors to using a property in B.C.’s Agricultural Land Reserve for a sewage project, he said. Katherine Dednya reports. (Times Colonist)

Nighttime low tide walk an otherworldly experience
After a hiatus of a few years, a pair of local naturalists are offering a guided tide-pool walk during an extreme low tide next month — an event that occurs at night in winter. Scouring the shallows during an extreme low tide can be an otherworldly experience. Tide pool exploration is even more fascinating at night, said Holly Roger of Wild Whatcom, a local nonprofit dedicated to outdoors education. Robert Mittendorf reports. (Bellingham Herald)

More cruise visitors expected next year on bigger ships
The Greater Victoria Harbour Authority marked the end of a record cruise-ship season with the arrival of Princess Cruises’ Star Princess at Ogden Point on Monday. Overall, the harbour authority welcomed 227 ship visits and about 533,000 passengers in 2015 — up from 206 ship visits and about 465,000 passengers the previous year. “It’s a record year,” said Ian Robertson, chief executive officer of the harbour authority…. Robertson said the harbour authority expects the same number of ships in 2016, but even more passengers as cruise lines continue to increase the size of their ships. Lindsay Kines reports. (Times Colonist)

Now, your tug weather--
WEST ENTRANCE U.S. WATERS STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA- 300 AM PST TUE NOV 10 2015
GALE WARNING IN EFFECT FOR TONIGHT AND WEDNESDAY
TODAY
SW WIND 5 TO 15 KT BECOMING S 15 TO 25 KT IN THE AFTERNOON. WIND WAVES 1 OR 2 FT BUILDING TO 2 TO 4 FT IN THE AFTERNOON. W SWELL 8 FT AT 12 SECONDS. AREAS OF FOG IN THE MORNING. CHANCE OF RAIN IN THE AFTERNOON.
TONIGHT
SW WIND 25 TO 35 KT BECOMING W AFTER MIDNIGHT. COMBINED SEAS 10 FT WITH A DOMINANT PERIOD OF 12 SECONDS. RAIN.

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