Friday, March 21, 2014

3/21 Orca attack, Exxon Valdez, tidal power, Tokitae, Futurewise in Whatcom, no oil terminal, coal risks, Fukushima

Daffodils (Nick Gonzales/Skagit Valley Herald)
If you like to watch: Killer whales attacking sea lions
Dramatic video of a pod of killer whales hunting sea lions Wednesday near Prince Rupert, B.C., posted by Travis Twizell.

25 Years Later, Exxon Valdez Spill Effects Linger
Before the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in 2010 in the Gulf of Mexico, there was the Exxon Valdez disaster in Alaska, at the time the nation's largest oil spill.... Twenty five years later, most of the species have recovered, said Robert Spies, a chief science adviser to governments on the oil spill restoration program from 1989 to 2002. But some wildlife, as well as the people who live in the region, are still struggling. Dan Joling reports. (Associated Press)

New blog: Oil And Water Don’t Mix— Never Have
“I learned about the Exxon Valdez going aground 25 years ago while working in corporate communications for the investor-owned utility, Hawaiian Electric Company. We sadly watched the national news for days as 11 million gallons of oil spread and coated the pristine shorelines...”

Feds OK Snohomish County PUD's Tidal Power Project In Admiralty Inlet
Federal regulators have given unanimous approval for an underwater energy project powered by the tides in Washington’s Admiralty Inlet. Two turbines will take advantage of the fast-moving currents and daily tidal movements in the busy passage west of Whidbey Island, at a depth of about 200 feet. Snohomish County PUD says the turbines will be connected to the electrical grid with cables that emerge on leased land south of the ferry dock in Coupeville. Bellamy Pailthorp reports. (KPLU)

State welcomes new ferry to Puget Sound
Washington transportation leaders christened a new ferry Thursday. It will provide service between Mukilteo and Clinton for the next six decades... Tokitae is the first of three new vessels that can carry 144 vehicles. They will replace aging and smaller ferries. Maria Guerrero reports. (KIRO) See also: New ferry Tokitae will serve Mukilteo-Clinton route  (Everett Herald)

Under new leadership in Whatcom, Futurewise to try cooperation
Futurewise, the organization that makes sure communities in Washington are following growth management law, has changed its tactics, its state director said. The organization known for litigating growth disputes has been partnering with local governments to help them protect resource lands and prevent urban sprawl before legal action is needed, Executive Director Hilary Franz said in an interview Thursday, March 20. A new hire at Futurewise, Whatcom Chapter Director Ryan Ericson, has the skills needed to work side by side with government planners, Franz said. He was a shoreline planner for the city of Bainbridge Island before starting with Futurewise on Monday, March 17. Ralph Schwartz reports. (Bellingham Herald)

Vancouver [WA] City Council Comes Out Against Oil Terminal
A majority of the Vancouver City Council now publicly opposes plans to build the Northwest’s largest oil-handling facility at the Port of Vancouver. Councilor Jack Burkman made his opposition known at the end of Monday’s council meeting. Councilors Anne McEnerny-Ogle, Bart Hansen and Larry Smith all confirmed to The Columbian on Wednesday that they, too, oppose the $110 million project proposed by Tesoro Corp. and Savage Companies. While the city council doesn’t have direct control over the project — Tesoro-Savage signed the lease with the Port of Vancouver’s Board of Commissioners, and the facility will have to be approved by Gov. Jay Inslee — having a majority of the seven-member council in opposition means the city can actively fight it. Aaron Corvin and Stephanie Rice report. (Columbian)

Study Tallies Economic Risks Of Oregon Coal Export Project
A study released Thursday by coal export opponents tallies the economic risks of barging coal down the Columbia River –- from the cost of killing salmon and emitting air pollution to increased accidents and impacts to recreation in the Columbia River Gorge. The report’s author, Ecotrust economist Noah Enelow, suggests that the project’s benefits might not be worth the risks of building the Morrow Pacific project. “The Morrow Pacific project places over $2 billion in natural and cultural assets at risk, including salmon habitat, recreational values and water quality,” he said in a statement. “These risks to livelihood, natural resources and economies must be studied further before an informed decision can be made.” Cassandra Profita reports. (EarthFix)

Fukushima Crisis
Georgia Strait Alliance has put up a web page to update the crisis: "The devastating explosions in 2011 at the Fukushima nuclear reactors in Japan released huge quantities of radioactive isotopes into the ocean and our atmosphere...."

Now, your weekend tug weather--
WEST ENTRANCE U.S. WATERS STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA- 300 AM PDT FRI MAR 21 2014
TODAY
E WIND TO 10 KT. WIND WAVES 1 FT OR LESS. W SWELL 6 FT AT 13 SECONDS.
TONIGHT
E WIND 5 TO 15 KT. WIND WAVES 2 FT OR LESS. W SWELL 5 FT AT 12 SECONDS.
SAT
SE WIND 5 TO 15 KT. WIND WAVES 2 FT OR LESS. W SWELL 4 FT AT 17 SECONDS. RAIN LIKELY BY AFTERNOON.
SAT NIGHT
SE WIND 5 TO 15 KT. WIND WAVES 2 FT OR LESS. W SWELL 6 FT AT 15 SECONDS.
SUN
SE WIND TO 10 KT...BECOMING E 10 TO 15 KT IN THE AFTERNOON. WIND WAVES 2 FT OR LESS. W SWELL 6 FT AT 14 SECONDS.
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"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to msato@salishseacom.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

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