Thursday, September 19, 2013

9/19 Octopus, birds & reptiles, Lummi journey, dope, plastic bags, pinks, Island View Beach, crows

Octo hatch (Laura James)
If you like to watch: Laura James captured an octopus hatch on 9/11, Octo hatch.  Katherine Harmon Courage explains in the Octopus Chronicles: Octopus Babies Hatch By the Thousands, Captured On Video

Monika Weiland at Orca Watcher blogs about her eight summers and five full years of birding in the San Juans-- and about a rare reptile sighting. Taking in the Smaller Things: Birds and Reptiles

The Lummi community has undertaken a Totem Pole Journey to raise awareness and opposition to the proposed Gateway Pacific coal terminal on their sacred lands. Here's how to support them. Kwel Hoy': We Draw the Line - A Totem Pole Journey to fight Big Coal!  

New blog: Three marijuana stores allowed in San Juan County; 334 retailers to sell in Washington statewide. Other Voices: The Dope Diaries  

The Tumwater City Council voted Tuesday to ban plastic grocery-style bags, becoming the first government in Thurston County to approve a ban that is under consideration countywide. Starting July 1, the thin film-style plastic bags will be off-limits. Shoppers will either have to bring their own reusable bags to stores or pay 5 cents per paper bag — money that goes directly to stores to offset their cost. Matt Batcheldor reports. Tumwater bans plastic grocery-style bags

Pink salmon, Puget Sound’s smallest, most short-lived and most abundant of five native salmon species, are returning in record numbers to the Nisqually River. There are so many of these 3- to 7-pound fish stacking up in the river, it conjures up the old saying: “They’re so thick, you could walk across the river on their backs.” They aren’t quite that thick, but they are pulsing upstream to spawn in numbers that boggle the mind. More than 700,000 pinks are expected to enter the river this year out of an estimated Puget Sound run size of 6.2 million fish. John Dodge reports. Pink salmon return to Nisqually River in record numbers

Sheila Stenzel and Jane Wynne were on a mission Wednesday at Island View Beach, hiking the waterfront to chart out activities for teachers. The pair were particularly interested in the park’s geological features — including its cliffs and a “drowned forest” beneath the sand and mud, said Wynne, a geologist. But those are just a few of the many special aspects of 52-hectare Island View Beach Regional Park, which is under close observation as a new management plan is prepared. Everything from dogs to dunes will be up for discussion as the future of Island View is charted in the coming months. Jeff Bell reports. Future of Island View Beach explored as CRD considers management plan  

After an examination of eight dead juvenile crows, a provincial wildlife veterinarian is baffled about what paralyzed and eventually killed dozens of crows. In July, Helen Schwantje received reports of paralyzed crows in B.C’s Peace Region...Schwantje says none of the young birds had an infectious virus, such as West Nile, and she says there is no evidence industry played a role. Dead crows mystery unsolved

The state Department of Health has closed beaches in southern Whatcom County to recreational shellfish harvesting because of unsafe levels of the biotoxin that causes paralytic shellfish poisoning. The ban affects beaches from Sandy Point south to the Whatcom-Skagit county border, including Lummi Island and Larrabee State Park. Kie Relyea reports.  Southern Whatcom County beaches closed to recreational shellfish harvesting

Now, your tug weather--
WEST ENTRANCE U.S. WATERS STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA- 304 AM PDT THU SEP 19 2013
SMALL CRAFT ADVISORY IN EFFECT THROUGH THIS AFTERNOON
TODAY
E WIND 15 TO 25 KT. WIND WAVES 2 TO 4 FT. NW SWELL 3 FT AT 9 SECONDS.
TONIGHT
E WIND TO 10 KT. WIND WAVES 1 FT OR LESS. W SWELL 5 FT AT 9 SECONDS...BUILDING TO 7 FT AT 12 SECONDS AFTER MIDNIGHT.
 SLIGHT CHANCE OF RAIN AFTER MIDNIGHT.

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"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to msato@salishseacom.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

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