Tuesday, May 22, 2012

5/22 June weather, Peter Ross, Kitsap runoff, Lincoln Loehr, nitrates, hatchery coho, frankenfish

Peter Ross
Scott Sistek writes: Late last week, the long range forecasters at NOAA's Climate Prediction Center released their new 30- and 90-day forecasts for the upcoming summer. And for the Pacific Northwest, it would appear that our sunny and summery mid-May was more of a tease than a sign of things to come -- at least in the short term. Beware the 'June Gloom'?

Canada's only marine mammal toxicologist at the Institute of Ocean Sciences on Vancouver Island is losing his job as the federal government cuts almost all employees who monitor ocean pollution across Canada. Peter Ross, an expert on killer whales and other marine mammals, was the lead author of a report 10 years ago that demonstrated Canada's killer whales are the most contaminated marine mammals on the planet. He has more than a 100 published reports.  B.C. killer whale expert out of work as feds cut ocean-pollution monitoring positions  

Some $3.8 million in state grants have been approved for seven stormwater projects in Kitsap County, including pervious parking lots in three county parks, 3.6 acres of porous pavement in downtown Poulsbo and a major stormwater upgrade in Manchester.  The $3.8 million is part of a statewide appropriation of $54 million for stormwater projects the Legislature approved as an "economic stimulus." The idea is to provide jobs while increasing protections for lakes, rivers and Puget Sound itself. Chris Dunagan reports. Stormwater grants will improve water quality across Kitsap  

If you want a good idea of what kinds of pollution are lurking in Puget Sound, and whether to worry about them, talking to Lincoln Loehr would be a good place to start.  Loehr has accumulated decades of experience as a scientist and marine policy expert. The Mukilteo resident has been sharing that expertise by volunteering with the Snohomish County Marine Resources Advisory Committee, where he was first appointed to serve in 2008. Noah Haglund reports. Scientist shares expertise with Puget Sound pollution  

Nitrate levels have been on the rise in Puget Sound since 2000. What exactly, might you ask, are nitrates? And furthermore, why should you care? Nitrates are naturally occurring chemical compounds left over after the break down of animal and human waste. So, how are nitrates getting into Puget Sound? Sure, some of it comes from the rich coastal upwellings of nutrients that make their way in to these protected waters. But scientists think it’s no accident that the rise in nitrate levels in the past dozen years corresponds with population growth around Puget Sound. Ashley Ahearn reports. Algae And Acidification: Connecting The Dots, From The Air  

Quilcene National Fish Hatchery’s recent releases of nearly 600,000 juvenile coho salmon into Hood Canal and Puget Sound waters marked the 101st consecutive year the hatchery has continued a program that supports area tribal and sport fish harvests. Quilcene hatchery releases juvenile coho

U.S. Sen. Lisa Murkowski is proposing to have the environmental and economic impacts of genetically modified fish studied before the fish are approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.  Murkowski's office says the analysis by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration would be in line with the review and standards in place currently for federal fisheries. It would be required before an FDA decision.  Alaska senators want more review of genetically modified salmon   Read also:  Entrepreneur Bankrolls a Genetically Engineered Salmon

Now, your tug weather--
WEST ENTRANCE U.S. WATERS STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA- 645 AM PDT TUE MAY 22 2012
TODAY
SW WIND 10 TO 15 KT...BECOMING E IN THE AFTERNOON. WIND WAVES 1 OR 2 FT. SW SWELL 6 FT AT 9 SECONDS. SHOWERS.
TONIGHT
W WIND 10 TO 20 KT. WIND WAVES 1 TO 3 FT. W SWELL 6 FT AT 9 SECONDS. A CHANCE OF SHOWERS.

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